Responding to Others’ Actions

Via Brain Pickings:

“It’s an astonishing gradual evolution to develop the ability to explain others’ actions by their distress, rather than simply in terms of how it affects us. We perceive that the appropriate response to humanity is not fear, cynicism or aggression, but always — when we can manage it — love. At such moments, the world reveals itself as quite different: a place of suffering and misguided effort, full of people striving to be heard and lashing out against others, but also a place of tenderness and longing, beauty, and touching vulnerability.”

Stress and Self-control

Via ScienceDaily:

“Self-control abilities are sensitive to perturbations at several points within this [neural] network, and optimal self-control requires a precise balance of input from multiple brain regions rather than a simple on/off switch.”

Stressed participants’ brains exhibited altered patterns of connectivity between regions including the amygdala, striatum, and the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, essentially reducing individuals’ ability to exercise self-control over food choices. Only some of these changes were associated with cortisol, a hormone commonly linked to stress.

Remove self-interest and personal glory from your motivation on the job

From New Managers Need a Philosophy About How They’ll Lead by Carol A. Walker:

Removing self-interest and personal glory from your motivation on the job is the single most important thing you can do to inspire trust. When you focus first on the success of your organization and your team, it comes through clearly. You ask more questions, listen more carefully, and actively value others’ needs and contributions. The result is more thoughtful, balanced decisions.